Helping you during Lockdown

Link from Runner's World : The 5-Minute Pre-run Warm-up That Helps Ease Soreness
Link from Runner's World : The Complete Guide to Stretching for Runners
Link for a Drill session which is for good form:

Side-to-Side Skip, Carioca, or Grapevine, A-Skip, B-Skip, Butt Kicks, High Knees, Straight Leg Run, Ankling

 https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/drills-for-proper-running-form

Link to a Jo Wicks HIIT workout on You Tube you can do indoors when it's too icy outside.
Fartlek

Descending Tempo Fartlek

Begin this session with a 6:00 minute run at roughly your half-marathon pace (if you don’t know what your pace would be just aim to be slower than usual)
The recovery is half of the time of the piece (in this case 3:00 minutes)
Run for 5:00 minutes slightly quicker than the 6:00 (with the rest now being 2:30)
Run for 4:00 piece a touch quicker (2:00 rest), 3:00 run (with 1:30 recovery), 2:00 run (1:00 recovery)
Finish with a 1:00 run. The final two pieces of this fartlek should be working into the current 5K fitness range.

31 minutes.

From UK Active

 

Faster Cadence

  The link at the bottom explain’s what it is and gives three example workouts to try and improve your speed/cadence.

I like the downhill sprints (a gentle slope for example the cycle path to the left of the pont y werin bridge on the way back to Tesco – or use the bottom half of a hill e.g Andrew road, anywhere near you that is safe!
Start off with your warm up ( onced warm you could work out your own cadence – count how many times a foot lands in 30secs X 2 for total) and then an easy run for roughly 20 mins, then 5 downhill sprints with either a walk or very gentle jog back to the start.
On the downhill sprints, try to be relaxed and go with the slope and not make your strides bigger but more of them.
Hill repeats

 Jelly leg challenge!… Penarth heights/zig-zag path with a twist… 5/10 min running warm up then starting at the bottom of the zig-zag path skip/high knees/side step etc to each bend alternating until you reach the top. Then begin your descent – when you reach the last bend start your ascent again, on the next lap go down one less bend and ascend again and so forth until back at the top. Power on the ascent. Recover on the descent. THE TWIST… once you are back to the top then gentle recover all the way to the bottom of the hill and then begin the whole process in reverse I.e run to the first bend and back to start, then the 2nd bend and back to start etc. Then 5-10 min cool down run. I’ve just done it and can confirm it’s a toughie!! Variations to try: add some walking reps in to give yourself a breather or power on descent recover on ascent. Good luck!

Intervals

HIIT Running Session 

 https://blog.mapmyrun.com/4-hiit-running-workouts-to-get-you-moving-fast/

The above link contains 4 x HITT Running workout sessions to get moving fast.  Some of it is very similar to work you’ve already done.  The duration of the sessions vary from 15 – 75 minutes.  

They all include a warm up run before moving onto the task itself.  The Hill session is particular interesting as it’s a good way to tackle hills!  Don’t forget to include some dynamic stretches too.  

Long Repeats

Here are two suggestions for you to try, you can mix and match, it’s to give you ideas or something to follow whichever works best for you 😊
Plan 1 –
Do a longer warm up of about 1 – 2 miles then end up at a flat spot where you have a straight run of up to roughly 150m
Rep 1 will be :-
2 or 3 x 100m – Fast pace/ sprint ( 1 – 2 min rest, need to be almost fully recovered as , you want to aim for the same effort for each one)

Rep 2 will be
2 or 3 x 150m – Fast pace ( 2 min rest)

Rep 3 will be
2 or 3 x 100m Fast pace) sprint (1-2 min rest)

Very slow jog or walk back to finish point.

If you wanted to mix it up you could also do
Each Rep is 1 x 100, 1 x 150, 1 x 100 recovery in between each one and repeat 6/9 times or as many as you can.
It’s the fast effort that will make a difference to your training/ running.

Alternatively if you have a block or loop near you to safely run around ( thinking of the distance of the one I have used in a session, to the bottom left of the oystercatcher loop)

Again a longer warm up (1-2 miles) One side of the loop run your fast pace all the way down and as you hit the bend take it down to a recovery jog/walk to start and repeat that 6 –  9 times. Not forgetting a rest after each one!
Recovery jog/ walk to finish point.
Happy running,

Progression Run

The idea is to start easy, speed up as you go along and finish fast. Decide how long you’re going to run for and split into 3 segments, say 15 minutes, 15 and 15. Do the first 15 minutes nice and easy – hold that pace . Speed up for 15 – but not too much. You need to have something left in the tank for the final 15 minutes. Keep the pace steady . Final segment – go faster again. As an example an experienced runner could split the 3 segments half marathon, 10k and 5k pace to finish- but adapt to suit individual. Finish with some good stretching. 

Pyramid
The set is a pyramid – first find yourself a pyramid…joke.
Start with a steady warm up, I would suggest 15 minutes in this cold weather, however, if you are still cold run for a little longer.
Pyramid with equal effort and recovery. 
1 minute effort
1 minute recovery 
2 minutes effort 
2 minutes recovery 
3 minutes effort
3 minutes recovery 
4 minutes effort 
4 minutes recovery 
Then come back down from 4 minutes back to 1 minute. 
This will be 32 minutes in all.
After this do your warm down thinking about perfect form –  pelvis tilted under you ( think bucket of water),open chest, lifting up feet, head up so chest is open.  Good luck all, 

 

Speed Laps

 Speed work helps you build up your speed and endurance.

This suggestion is based on time segments rather than laps to make it easier to do on your own. You’ll need to concentrate a bit so the time will fly past. Don’t worry if you lose track of things – the most important thing is to mix up short bursts of fast running with recovery running.
Start with warm up run.
Run 5 seconds faster than 5k pace for 1 minute. Easy run for 1 minute.
Same for 2 minutes.
Same for 3 minutes
Same for 3 minutes
Same for 2 minutes
Same for 1 minute
Easy running and cool down with stretches.

 

Surge

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Some Dynamic stretches

Examples of Dynamic stretches include:-

Knee hug – lifting knee up into the chest – you can either do this as you walk or on the spot

Side lunge

Straight leg swing

Frankenstein kicks – arms out straight – kick one leg up as high as you can towards outstretched arms.  Drop leg back down and kick up opposite leg.

 

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Monday 18th January: Fartlek

Descending Tempo Fartlek

Begin this session with a 6:00 minute run at roughly your half-marathon pace (if you don’t know what your pace would be just aim to be slower than usual)
The recovery is half of the time of the piece (in this case 3:00 minutes)
Run for 5:00 minutes slightly quicker than the 6:00 (with the rest now being 2:30)
Run for 4:00 piece a touch quicker (2:00 rest), 3:00 run (with 1:30 recovery), 2:00 run (1:00 recovery)
Finish with a 1:00 run. The final two pieces of this fartlek should be working into the current 5K fitness range.

31 minutes.

From UK Active

Speed & Endurance

Karen helping Jo with this suggestion:

Warm up first. 

Pick a hill with lanp posts, ie Customhouse hill or road by lifeboat station that runs along the coast.

Run as fast as you can to the lamppost at the top of the hill, recover on the way down, run fast as you can to the lampost one before the previous one, recover on the way down. Repeat until you are back at the bottom with no more lampposts to run to.  Cool down run and stretch.

 Karen x

Tuesday 19th January: Speed Laps
Speed work helps you build up your speed and endurance.
This suggestion is based on time segments rather than laps to make it easier to do on your own. You’ll need to concentrate a bit so the time will fly past. Don’t worry if you lose track of things – the most important thing is to mix up short bursts of fast running with recovery running.
Start with warm up run.
Run 5 seconds faster than 5k pace for 1 minute. Easy run for 1 minute.
Same for 2 minutes.
Same for 3 minutes
Same for 3 minutes
Same for 2 minutes
Same for 1 minute
Easy running and cool down with stretches.
Have fun!
Sarah, Sue, Deb and Bron x
Wednesday 20th January: LSD

Steady runs are a great way to build aerobic strength, which is the foundation for your best performances from 5k, 10k, half to full marathon.

Steady runs should be “comfortably hard”, which is perfect when the objective is to add a little bit of hard running to the schedule, but not go overboard.
Start each steady run with a mile at normal, easy pace. Keep the pace easy, this mile is a warm-up mile to get the blood flowing to the legs and loosen up your muscles.
After the first easy mile, take a brief minute or two to stretch anything that is tight, sore, or that has been bothering you lately. I like this dynamic warm up sequence to prepare the body.
Ease into the steady pace over the first mile or two.
You don’t have to go from standing start to steady pace in the first 100 meters. Let your body fall into the pace naturally. Some days this will feel easy and other days getting down to steady pace will be a challenge.
Because steady runs are usually a little longer than tempo runs, you’ll have to work on concentrating over a longer distance. Work on staying focused throughout the run and concentrating on your pace and effort.

Use the last mile as a mini cool down. Bring the pace back down to an easy pace and enjoy the feeling of job well done. The cool down will help your muscles relax and start the recovery process.
Enjoy your Run
Sue and Debbie
Thursday 21st January: Short Hill Repeats

Hill Repeats

30-second hill sprints at a 5% to 10% incline
Warm up with 1 to 1.5 miles of easy running, then do dynamic drills such as high knees, skips, and lunges before beginning the incline.
Take each 30-second hill repeat at a nearly all-out speed (at about the 25-seconds you should be wondering if you’ll make it to 30 seconds). Rest with a walk or an easy jog for 2 to 3 minutes in between.
Start with 5 to 8 repetitions and work your way up to 12 to 14.
Hope you enjoy
Sue, Debbie, Donna, Wendy and Laura
14th January 2021 Drills

Link for a Drill session which is for good form:  

Side-to-Side Skip,

Carioca, or Grapevine

A-Skip 

B-Skip

Butt Kicks

High Knees

Straight Leg Run

Ankling

 

 https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/drills-for-proper-running-form/

                                                                                                Donna x

Monday 11th January 2021. Speed & Endurance

Helen Dyer suggesting one of Jo’s  S & E session that’s always a challenge: the zig-zag work out.
Warm up along the marina and up custom to top of zig-zag, then down to the bottom gently (8th bend I believe!) and power back up🤪 – then recover down to the next bend (7)from the bottom, power up and so on using each bend as a turning point. It starts hard but each lap gets a little shorter.  There I are lights there too if you run after work . Helen x

11th January 2021 Long Repeats

I have put two suggestions for you to try or as Donna said in her post you can mix and match it’s to give you ideas or something to follow whichever works best for you 😊
Plan 1 –
Do a longer warm up of about 1 – 2 miles then end up at a flat spot where you have a straight run of up to roughly 150m
Rep 1 will be :-
2 or 3 x 100m – Fast pace/ sprint ( 1 – 2 min rest, need to be almost fully recovered as , you want to aim for the same effort for each one)

Rep 2 will be
2 or 3 x 150m – Fast pace ( 2 min rest)

Rep 3 will be
2 or 3 x 100m Fast pace) sprint (1-2 min rest)

Very slow jog or walk back to finish point.

If you wanted to mix it up you could also do
Each Rep is 1 x 100, 1 x 150, 1 x 100 recovery in between each one and repeat 6/9 times or as many as you can.
It’s the fast effort that will make a difference to your training/ running.

Alternatively if you have a block or loop near you to safely run around ( thinking of the distance of the one I have used in a session, to the bottom left of the oystercatcher loop)

Again a longer warm up (1-2 miles) One side of the loop run your fast pace all the way down and as you hit the bend take it down to a recovery jog/walk to start and repeat that 6 –  9 times. Not forgetting a rest after each one!
Recovery jog/ walk to finish point.
Happy running, look forward to hearing how you get on 🏃‍♀️😊 
Lynne x

Tuesday 12th January 2021 Progression Run

The idea is to start easy, speed up as you go along and finish fast. Decide how long you’re going to run for and split into 3 segments, say 15 minutes, 15 and 15. Do the first 15 minutes nice and easy – hold that pace . Speed up for 15 – but not too much. You need to have something left in the tank for the final 15 minutes. Keep the pace steady . Final segment – go faster again. As an example an experienced runner could split the 3 segments half marathon, 10k and 5k pace to finish- but adapt to suit individual. Finish with some good stretching. Sarah W x

Wednesdaya 13th January 2021 Intervals

HIIT Running Session 

 https://blog.mapmyrun.com/4-hiit-running-workouts-to-get-you-moving-fast/

The above link contains 4 x HITT Running workout sessions to get moving fast.  Some of it is very similar to work you’ve already done.  The duration of the sessions vary from 15 – 75 minutes.  

They all include a warm up run before moving onto the task itself.  The Hill session is particular interesting as it’s a good way to tackle hills!  Don’t forget to include some dynamic stretches too. 

This page also has a link to dynamic warm up stretches which are worth having a look at

Examples of Dynamic stretches include:-

Knee hug – lifting knee up into the chest – you can either do this as you walk or on the spot

Side lunge

Straight leg swing

Frankenstein kicks – arms out straight – kick one leg up as high as you can towards outstretched arms.  Drop leg back down and kick up opposite leg.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ortypveAL0

If you fancy a change – or want to add an indoor session to your weekly programme then check out Jo Wicks on You Tube.  I’ve had a go at this session attached which was a really good HIIT workout.  It’s good to mix things up a bit too

Jeanette x

Monday 4th Jan 2021 Faster Cadence

  The link at the bottom explain’s what it is and gives three example workouts to try and improve your speed/cadence.

I like the downhill sprints (a gentle slope for example the cycle path to the left of the pont y werin bridge on the way back to Tesco – or use the bottom half of a hill e.g Andrew road, anywhere near you that is safe!
Start off with your warm up ( onced warm you could work out your own cadence – count how many times a foot lands in 30secs X 2 for total) and then an easy run for roughly 20 mins, then 5 downhill sprints with either a walk or very gentle jog back to the start.
On the downhill sprints, try to be relaxed and go with the slope and not make your strides bigger but more of them.
Hope that makes sense, enjoy and hope it’s not too long before we are back together running 🏃‍♀️😊  Lynne x
Monday 4th Jan 2021 S & E : Pyramid
The set is a pyramid – first find yourself a pyramid…joke.
Start with a steady warm up, I would suggest 15 minutes in this cold weather, however, if you are still cold run for a little longer.
Pyramid with equal effort and recovery. 
1 minute effort
1 minute recovery 
2 minutes effort 
2 minutes recovery 
3 minutes effort
3 minutes recovery 
4 minutes effort 
4 minutes recovery 
Then come back down from 4 minutes back to 1 minute. 
This will be 32 minutes in all.
After this do your warm down thinking about perfect form –  pelvis tilted under you ( think bucket of water),open chest, lifting up feet, head up so chest is open.  Good luck all,  Jo x